10-4 Good Buddy!

Yogi Parker – KETO Trucker Extraordinaire – who I had the absolute pleasure of having dinner with while he was delivering a huge old truck load of goodies to Connecticut the other week – has so much cooking-in-a-truck goodness to share that we’ve teamed up to bring his recipes right to your device of choice!

Whether you’re living in a truck, a tiny home, or a regular house, you can benefit from these amazing, innovative recipes! I’ll format and pretty them up later, but for now just wanted to start getting them to you.

Now Yogi was all worried about his photos – and wondered if I would remake the dishes and shoot them all fancy. Oh heck no! Yogi’s pictures are proof that all of this gourmet goodness happened IN A TRUCK!

So this is Yogi’s unabridged, unedited recipe in all it’s glory! You can join Yogi and I in the Keto Kitchen Facebook Group, or over on Patreon. Come hang!

 

 

WHAT YOU NEED

  • 5 lb chicken thighs – skin on
  • 1 lb ground breakfast sausage
  • 1 1/2 cup of sliced mushrooms
  • 1 cup chopped celery stalk
  • 1/2 cup chicken bone broth
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/8 cup chopped onion
  • Juice from one large lemon
  • 3 TBSP of chopped fresh garlic
  • 2 TBSP of ghee or butter
  • 1/4 cup of chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tsp of konjac flour / glucomannan powder
  • Sea salt
  • Ground black pepper
  • Dried sage
  • Dried thyme

 

WHAT YOU DO

  1. Lay out chicken thighs and pat the surface of chicken dry.
  2. Season skin side liberally with salt, pepper, dried thyme and sage.
  3. Set skillet at 400 degrees, add ghee (or butter). Allow the oil to get hot and arrange the chicken skin side down and season the other side.
  4. Cook until skin is golden brown, flip over and cook until that side is golden.
  5. Remove the chicken and set aside.
  6. Reduce heat to 250 degrees, add sausage turn it into crumbles and cook until browned, remove and set aside.
  7. Add onion, garlic and celery, and mushrooms.
  8. Sauté until onions just start to turn translucent.
  9. Add bone broth and lemon to deglaze pan, then add the konjac flour and stir to incorporate.
  10. Simmer, stirring occasionally for about five minutes, and then add cream and stir to incorporate.
  11. Return sausage and chicken to the skillet.
  12. Add parsley, cover and simmer for about twenty minutes.
  13. Remove lid and continue to simmer for about ten minutes to allow sauce to thicken.

Goes great with creamy mashed cauliflower, cooked greens, roasted seasoned veggies.

 

Want delicious uber-healthy recipes? Check out my Cookbooks!

10-4 Good Buddy!

Yogi Parker – KETO Trucker Extraordinaire – who I had the absolute pleasure of having dinner with while he was delivering a huge old truck load of goodies to Connecticut the other week – has so much cooking-in-a-truck goodness to share that we’ve teamed up to bring his recipes right to your device of choice!

Whether you’re living in a truck, a tiny home, or a regular house, you can benefit from these amazing, innovative recipes! I’ll format and pretty them up later, but for now just wanted to start getting them to you.

Now Yogi was all worried about his photos – and wondered if I would remake the dishes and shoot them all fancy. Oh heck no! Yogi’s pictures are proof that all of this gourmet goodness happened IN A TRUCK!

So this is Yogi’s unabridged, unedited recipe in all it’s glory! You can join Yogi and I in the Keto Kitchen Facebook Group, or over on Patreon. Come hang!

 

 

WHAT YOU NEED

 

WHAT YOU DO

  1. Set Instant Pot on sauté mode, and add coconut oil.
  2. When oil is hot, place chicken skin side down in pot, leaving some space between chicken pieces.
  3. Sauté each piece until slightly browned, and place browned chicken pieces in a separate bowl. In my Instant Pot I can fit two to three pieces of chicken at a time.
  4. After chicken is done, add in ginger and garlic and sauté for about two minutes.
  5. Sprinkle in konjac flour while stirring then add in the bone broth, coconut aminos, black pepper, Lakanto, bay leaf and vinegar.
  6. Stir mixture on sauté mode for about one minute and add chicken back into the mix.
  7. Place the lid on the Instant Pot, and set it on meat/stew mode for 45 minutes with vent open.

 

Serve on konjac rice, cauliflower rice fried in ghee and coconut oil, or on squash noodles fried in ghee and coconut oil, topped with some chopped green onion, maybe a little kimchi on the side, or just eat it straight up.

You can also do this recipe with pork shoulder, butt or belly of equal weight cut into bite sized cubes.

For a spicier Adobo, add a tablespoon or two of a chili pepper paste or chili pepper flakes when you add the chicken back in.

 

Want delicious uber-healthy recipes? Check out my Cookbooks!

10-4 Good Buddy!

Yogi Parker – KETO Trucker Extraordinaire – who I had the absolute pleasure of having dinner with while he was delivering a huge old truck load of goodies to Connecticut the other week – has so much cooking-in-a-truck goodness to share that we’ve teamed up to bring his recipes right to your device of choice!

Whether you’re living in a truck, a tiny home, or a regular house, you can benefit from these amazing, innovative recipes! I’ll format and pretty them up later, but for now just wanted to start getting them to you.

Now Yogi was all worried about his photos – and wondered if I would remake the dishes and shoot them all fancy. Oh heck no! Yogi’s pictures are proof that all of this gourmet goodness happened IN A TRUCK!

So this is Yogi’s unabridged, unedited recipe in all it’s glory! You can join Yogi and I in the Keto Kitchen Facebook Group, or over on Patreon. Come hang!

 

WHAT YOU NEED

  • 4 eggs
  • 1 pack of bacon chopped in cubes
  • 1 pack pre-cooked pork belly
  • 2 cups of eggplant cut into bite size cubes
  • 2 x 14.5 oz cans of stewed tomatoes
  • 1 x 12 oz jar of roasted red peppers
  • 10 oz jar of harissa
  • 8 oz package of slice mushrooms
  • 1 cup chopped bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • 1 jalapeño diced and seeded (optional)
  • 2 TBSP chopped garlic
  • 1 TSP ground coriander
  • 1 TSP paprika
  • Green onion
  • Sea salt
  • Ground black pepper
  • Crumbled goat cheese for topping

 

WHAT YOU DO

  1. Place skillet over medium heat, place chopped bacon in skillet and cook until done but soft.
  2. Remove bacon, drain out all but two tablespoons of bacon grease, and reduce heat to low.
  3. Add garlic and onion, sauté until onions just start becoming translucent.
  4. Add in bell pepper, mushrooms, bacon and eggplant, sauté for about ten minutes.
  5. Add roasted red pepper, harissa sauce, tomatoes, parsley coriander and paprika and increase heat to medium.
  6. Stir to incorporate, and bring to a boil.
  7. Use a spoon to create little troughs for the eggs and crack an egg into each trough.
  8. Slice the pork belly into thin strips and layer the strips across the top of the mixture so that they get hot.
  9. Allow the mixture to simmer until eggs reach desired doneness.
  10. Sprinkle some crumbled goat cheese, parsley and green onion over the top.
  11. Remove from heat, and allow to stand for about five minutes, then serve.

 

 

 

Want delicious uber-healthy recipes? Check out my Cookbooks!
  • McDonna - This looks ferocious! Are those green olives I see in the photo? That would make perfect sense, since Middle Eastern dishes traditionally included olives. I didn’t see olives listed in the recipe, though. Did I overlook them?

    Kudos to you, Yogi, for taking charge of your nutritional health while on the road! RESPECT!ReplyCancel

    • McDonna - Lol – good ol’ auto-correct turned delicious into ferocious!ReplyCancel

I always used to say that I liked a bit of bread with my butter.  Now, thanks to going wheat-, gluten-, and grain-free I can just skip the bread altogether.  Winning!

Do you remember the best butter you ever ate?  I do.  9 years ago – almost to the day – I was dining with some business colleagues at a Michelin 3-starred restaurant in Paris owned by Alain Ducasse who is arguably one of the finest chefs in the world.  Alain joined us for the cheese course, dessert, and coffee (one of our party was Alain’s neighbor and another was the Vice President of Microsoft, hence the privilege of having Alain at our table).  He had a cellar full of 100-year-old aged cheeses, and wines that cost more money than I earn in a month.  But what made me want to marry him was this: he made his own butter.  I remember the color – which rightfully should have it’s own Pantone number, the consistency, and oh la la that very first taste.  I swear my heart beat a little faster.  I stopped eating, turned in wonder to my beautiful French friend, Coralie, and declared, “I just want butter for dinner”.  She nodded slowly.  She understood.

Things you need to know about butter include that you should exclusively be using it as opposed to any other spreadable butter-like stuff.  There should be nothing that even vaguely resembles butter in your ‘fridge or pantry that isn’t actually butter.  It’s *real* butter or nothing!  Down with butter imposters!  (In the interests of my quest to write shorter posts, along with not being the science nerd around here, and having neither the time nor inclination to write the why, read this.)

You should exclusively be using butter that has been made from the milk of cows that are grass-fed.  If you live outside the US you might well be wondering why I am even mentioning this (because all cows eat grass, right??). If you live in the US you might well be wondering why I am even mentioning this (because butter is butter is butter, right??).  No and no.  (If you didn’t read the link in the last paragraph and want to know why the answer to both those questions is no, read this.)  And if you have any doubts about how the quality of milk can be dramatically affected by the diet of the milk-producer, read this.

I use Kerrygold Irish Butter.  It is the gold standard for grass-fed butter in the US.  It tastes and cooks nothing like regular American butter.  Try it once and you will never go back.

 

happy cows

 

You should keep your butter in a covered dish out on the counter.  Americans – this includes you.  Unless you live somewhere where the ambient room temperature renders butter into a puddle, or it takes you a month to get through one package – and if it does then that’s a different conversation that we need to have.  It will not go bad if you don’t keep it in the ‘fridge.  75 million Brits have never put their butter in the ‘fridge and there has never been one single case of RTBP (Room Temperature Butter Poisoning) reported.  Why keep it on the counter?  Because soft and delicious.  And because not hard and tasteless.  Hard butter makes everything difficult whether you’re just trying to spread it on any of these or you’re whipping up magic.  Hard butter is very annoying.  Room temperature butter is delightful.

You should buy your Kerrygold in bulk at Costco so you can get it for much cheaper than the grocery stores and make sure that you never run out (in the US the next cheapest place to get Kerrygold is at Trader Joe’s or Walmart or some other grocery stores when they have sales).  You can store your bulk stash in the freezer, then once you need it transfer it to your covered dish and store it on the counter.  I am repeating this ‘on the counter’ part because I know some of you Americans are sitting there with your hands over your ears singing, “La la la la la la la la”.

And lastly, we have arrived at what is probably the best tip I have given you on anything, ever. And it’s a tip on butter.

I have no idea how I’ve been writing here for over 4 years and not shared this before.  When you forget to take the golden goodness out of the freezer in advance (or you are still steadfastly refusing to store it on the counter) and you have some of these rising in the oven, to avoid a disaster of colossal proportions when you realize that you won’t be able to slather on some yellow heaven and eat one hot from the baking sheet, here’s how to soften your butter in a heartbeat:  GRATE IT.  It is even quicker than microwaving it and is foolproof, which microwaving is most definitely not. Come on – own up. How many times have you microwaved your butter for half a second too long and ended up with a puddle?  Seriously, grate it.  Big side on the box grater over a plate or bowl.  Grate, grate, grate, done.  Two minutes later you will have perfect, evenly soft, spreadable butter.

Alain Ducasse, you can still butter me up anytime.

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Want delicious uber-healthy recipes? Check out my Cookbooks!
  • Vanessa - My mother was afraid of fats and is still terrified of animal products. (She’s positive I’m going to keel over from the 90-120 grams of protein – mostly chicken, eggs and sardines – I eat daily, even though I’m also eating 10-15 servings of veggies.)

    As a result, I need a lot of help in the recipes-using-butter department. So far I’ve managed to successfully add it to sauteed green beans with garlic (yum!). What other non-baking things is it good in? Because the chances of me baking this year are earthworm-slim.ReplyCancel

  • Raina - Grated butter! MIND BLOWN! Okay, totally going to do that when I’ve bought it straight from the store and need to use it immediately, because you know…. my butter lives on the counter ;)ReplyCancel

  • Peter. Turner - Hi carey, thanks for all you do. Currently making your pumpkin pie squares from your new recipe book which we just bought. I don’t know if I’m supposed to be using salted or unsalted butter. comments or thoughts? I’m sort of assuming it would say unsalted in the recipe if it was, otherwise it probably is salted. Paragraph thanks!

    PeteReplyCancel

  • m.2 slot z170 - Eggs – Eggs aren’t just cheap, but additionally full of proteins.
    Separate good content with bad ones just by scanning along with the article.
    One specific and simple theme precisely what should be focused from.ReplyCancel

One of the trickiest things about low carb and keto cooking is finding a good replacement for cornstarch to thicken dishes with. Since you found yourself here at this little blog, you’re in luck, because I have trialed all the things up the yin yang to figure out which alternatives work best, and for what. A lot of folks are under the impression that all thickeners work the same and can be swapped out willy-nilly for one another. But, if you really want the best results, that’s not a great idea. Instead, use the right thickener for the job and get great results every single time! Who doesn’t want that?

But first, here’s the things that will add carbs to your dishes if you use them as thickeners: cornstarch, arrowroot, tapioca flour or starch, potato starch. Just because you’ve seen these used in recipes that call themselves low carb or keto, doesn’t mean they are.

Now, if you’re reading ahead and thinking, “Seriously? I need to get 3 different new ingredients??” Yes. If you want amazing results. Yes. If you want delicious keto or low carb food. Yes. If you want to be a rockstar in the kitchen. Yes. If you want to convince your friends and family that keto or low carb food is The Bomb. I even made it super easy for you to get them into your pantry: they are all linked below. So just get them. And have them on hand. And become a  better cook instantly.

 

Here is your handy-dandy little cheat sheet for what to use when:

Konjac Flour (aka Glucomannan powder) : This is ideal for thickening gravies, sauces, soups, and other hot dishes. It results in a beautiful texture. When reheated after being refrigerated, the dishes don’t separate and are still just as beautiful as when they were first prepared.

When using konjac flour (if the amount is not stated in the recipe, or you are creating your own recipe), start with 1/2 teaspoon per cup of liquid. The most successful method is to wait until your dish is ready and then, stirring with one hand, gently sprinkle the konjac flour evenly over the surface of the dish with the other hand. Then stir fast and well until it is completely incorporated. Continue heating for a few minutes while stirring for it to thicken. If you then want your dish to be thicker, repeat with another 1/2 teaspoon konjac flour. Repeat this process until you reach the desired thickness.

NOTE: Konjac flour does not thicken instantly, and a little goes a long way. By adding konjac flour 1/2 teaspoon at a time, you can get your dish to your desired thickness. If you inadvertently add too much konjac flour and it becomes too thick, just add a little more liquid – stock, water – and stir well.

Xanthan Gum : This is best used to provide structure to keto baked goods. While it doesn’t perform exactly like gluten, it gives you a baked good that does not crumble and fall apart as much as one that doesn’t include it. This is not good to use to thicken sauces, soups, gravies, or other hot dishes.  It will result in a slimy texture and it does not reheat well. Slimy is not a good taste. Your dish will separate after reheating.

Guar Gum : The best use for guar gum is in cold applications such as ice cream or smoothies. Guar gum is an emulsifier and keeps smoothies from separating into layers. This is also not good to use to thicken sauces. The texture is off and this also does not reheat well. Guar gum is also apt to become slimy, especially when used with dairy products such as cream and cheese.

Gelatin : This is best used when called for as part of a recipe that has already been formulated. Gelatin does thicken, kind of, but it actually gels, which is different. It also does not gel until it is cold, not not useful for hot things.

 

These are often suggested as thickeners but are not actually thickeners:

Cream Cheese and Heavy Whipping Cream : These are excellent to add flavor and creaminess to sauces, but they do not thicken it. With cream, if you then simmer it for a period of time and drive off some of the water your dish will become thicker. With cream cheese, because it’s super thick in will make a lot of dishes seem thicker, but it doesn’t actually thicken. Cream cheese may be enough to make your dish thicker, but you need to use quite a lot and it might throw the balance of other ingredients and the flavor off.

Coconut Flour : Using this to thicken a sauce will result in a gritty and grainy sauce, and it also affects the flavor. I highly recommend NOT using coconut flour to try and thicken.

Almond Flour : This is also not a thickener and also results in a gritty and grainy sauce. I highly recommend NOT using almond flour to try and thicken.

 

Need fabulous soup and dinner recipes to make use of your new thickener skills?  Just click on one or both of these!

 

 

Want delicious uber-healthy recipes? Check out my Cookbooks!
  • Ellen Lane Dozier - Thank you for this!
    I was under the impression that Xantham Gum is a derivative of corn. Am I wrong?
    You are a valuable part of my wellness journey.
    Thank you, again!
    EllenReplyCancel

    • carrie - Xanthan ‘can’ be made from corn, but contains no corn protein and no starch so not a concern.ReplyCancel

  • Molly Risewick - Carrie, I have been trying to figure out how I might recreate my family’s cranberry sherbet. It calls for 2 cups of sugar and the sugar would also be part of the reason it loosely freezes…Have you tried the guar gum in anything frozen? I am wondering how much I would need between using stevia to sweeten and guar gum to help thicken and help give the frozen treat a sherbet texture.ReplyCancel

    • carrie - I use guar gum in everything frozen! But, stevia will not work as a sweetener and guar gum actually reduces the iciness, not increases it. Guar is not used s a thickener in ice cream, it’s used as an emulsifier and stabilizer.ReplyCancel